McClure, Dorothy Clark

profile_Mcclure1
Sex: Female
Birth Date/Place: February 14, 1934, Guelph, Ontario
Death Date/Place: August 19, 2012, Newmarket, Ontario
Technique:
  • Drawing
  • Painting

Biographical Links:

Dorothy Clark McClure.  

www.obits.dignity memorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=Dorothy-McClure&LC=3162&pid=15931313780&mid=5210625

"Son celebrates a 'life well lived," The Auroran, October 13, 2013.

"Remembering Dorothy Clark McClure."  yorkscene.wordpress.com/2012/09/19remembering-dorothy-clark-mcclure/

 



Ms. Clark studied at the Central Technical School in Toronto to be a commercial artist.  Her first employers were the American Paper Box Company and Liberty Magazine.  In 1967 she turned to fine arts and purchased the Red House in Aurora, and re-purposed the heritage building into a studio and home.  She was passionate about heritage preservation and Aurora historian John McIntyre recalls, "Dorothy always felt like she was just a few steps ahead of the bulldozer and often she was because I think people value their heritage buildings more 9today) then they did back in 1968.  Dorothy was making people aware of what they were losing."  

In 1981 Dorothy travelled to the Nova Scotia and the South Shore and  produced her first set of full colour prints that won an international award of excellence in the US. On this trip she sketched the Chester Train Station and the then newly-formed Chester Municipal Heritage Society ordered copies of prints, notes and cards to use on Society communication materials.  This image has been retained as the Society's signature image. Dorothy's son (now an art teacher in adulthood, recalls "...some of my earliest memories are of traipsing out to various locations, sitting on stools, waiting for mom to draw or paint the landscape, or the building, or whatever it was.  There was no real family vacation that didn't include a watercolour pad or a set of art tools and there always had to be a stop somewhere."

Dorothy was a prolific artist and her interests evolved as years passed. In later years she was fascinated with spiritual and intuitional art, and is quoted as saying, "there is more to art than making money. Creating art helps you find your spiritual instincts."   

Dorothy was a greatly respected citizen and is remembered as "one of York Region's most respected artists.  She was honoured locally and provincially as an inspirational teacher, talented artist and diligent conservationist." She was awarded a Bicentennial medal from the Province of Ontario and a Certificate of Achievement from tje Ontario Heritage Trust.

 

Personal Images | Click images below for a larger view
Work Images | Click images below for a larger view